This blog post is the first one of a three parts article about Hillary Clinton’s campaign for the 2016 US presidency.

The future is old

At the beginning of the 2000’s era, some folks were saying when talking about political campaigns ahead, that Internet will be the place where everything will happen, that it will be the next political battleground. The internet will even be the “key” for everything happening during any upcoming presidential campaign.

Well, fifteen years later, we can say it is true, partly. A presidential campaign stays very “personal”. What I mean by that is that the choice of the future President is still a choice of a personality rather than a political party, and this is more an emotional choice than something else.

A parallel is easy to make with the use of the Internet for political leaders who want to reach the top or even wannabe political leaders. I’m talking about the use of the never-ending growing galaxy of digital tools out there. Which one to use? What are the most relevant? And what to do with them? Many campaigns have been made so far during the age of internet and we went from simple website to Facebook posts and retweets by millions. As connected citizens, politics has followed the digital revolution and matures his

Many campaigns have been made so far during the age of internet and we went from simple website to Facebook posts and retweets by millions. As connected citizens, politics has followed the digital revolution and matures his behaviour toward new tools and new usage of them. Whether this is a flag, a flyer, a blog, a Facebook banner or a video on Instagram, politics are always looking for two things: communicating and convincing.

However, digital is not everything: it won’t replace anytime soon real meeting with real people in real situations and that is why Hillary is hitting the road (again) to meet Americans. This is also the best way, for her, to distant herself from haters from any side of the political and media field claiming that she is too distant, that she is arrogant, too far from day-to-day American’s from poor to middle-class or the “best” of all: that she is too old and doesn’t stand a chance to appear as a leader of a new generation for politic renewal in Washington.

We are only a few weeks after Hillary Clinton officially announced her candidacy but we can already read and analyze some of the tools that she and her team will use until November 2016 regarding people already on the field building strategies.

Obama’s Alumni are recruited (and Silicon Valley’s exec as well

Hillary Clinton digs since a few months into ex-members of Obama’s team from the 2008 and 2012 campaigns. People like Andrew Bleeker, a digital marketing guru and veteran of Obama’s 2008 and 2012. It is the same treat for Teddy Goff, the digital director of President Obama’s 2012 reelection campaign.

Even a few days before her official announcement of running for presidency, Hillary Clinton hired an ex-Google executive as tech chief: Stephanie Hannon, who was previously Google’s director of product management for civic innovation and social impact.

While Barack Obama won the 2008 campaign for many reasons, it is mainly due to its new and innovative way to use new technologies and social medias for spreading news, raising money and to mobilize Americans all over the country.

At that time, Hillary Clinton was struggling with the old-fashion way of hitting a campaign. 8 years later, things have changed, both in the (social) media galaxy and Hillary Clinton’s mind. Yes, she still wants to become the first female US President and so far she seemed to have to level-up her awareness of this digital world.

Part #2 of the article coming soon, stay tuned, thanks for reading!

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